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Effect of Short-Term Maximal Exercise on Biochemical Markers of Muscle Damage, Total Antioxidant Status, and Homocysteine Levels in Football Players

AUTHORS

Omar Hammouda 1 , * , Hamdi Chtourou 1 , Anis Chaouachi 1 , Henda Chahed 2 , Salyma Ferchichi 2 , Choumous Kallel 3 , Karim Chamari 4 , Nizar Souissi 4

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 Research Laboratory 'Sport Performance Optimisation, National Center of Medicine and Science in Sport

2 Laboratory of Biochemistry, CHU Farhat Hached, Sousse, Tunisia

3 Laboratory of hematology, CHU Habib Bourguiba, Sfax, Tunisia

4 High Institute of Sport and Physical Education, Ksar-Sad, Manouba University, Tunisia

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Asian Journal of Sports Medicine: 3 (4); 239-246
Published Online: November 30, 2012
Article Type: Research Article
Received: March 20, 2012
Accepted: May 7, 2012
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Abstract

Purpose: Prolonged physical exercise results in transient elevations of biochemical markers of muscular damage. This study examined the effect of short-term maximal exercise on these markers, homocysteine levels (Hcy), and total antioxidant status (TAS) in trained subjects.

Methods: Eighteen male football players participated in this study. Blood samples were collected 5-min before and 3-min after a 30-s Wingate test.

Results: The results indicated that plasma biochemical markers of muscle injury increased significantly after the Wingate test (P<0.05). Moreover, significant increase of white blood Cells and their main subpopulations (i.e. monocytes, neutrophiles, and lymphocytes) (P<0.001) has been observed. Likewise, uric acid, total bilirubin, and TAS increased significantly after exercise (P<0.05). However, Hcy levels were unaffected by the Wingate test (for 3-min post-exercise measurement).

Conclusions: Short-term maximal exercise (e.g. 30-s Wingate test) is of sufficient intensity and duration to increase markers of muscle damage, and TAS; but not Hcy levels. Increases in the selected enzymes probably come primarily from muscle damage, rather than liver damage. Moreover, increase of TAS confirms the Wingate test induced oxidative stress.

Keywords

Muscles Injury Exercise Homocysteine Antioxidants Wingate Test

© 2012, Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
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